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Cemetery 24 Young William PHC&M 16

(2017)

William Henry Young (1871-1942).

Name a venerable local institution and — if it existed in William Young’s lifetime — he was probably involved in it. Heck, he was probably head of it. Seamen’s Bank? Young was president of the Seamen’s Savings Bank, as it was called at the time, and a member of its board for a half century. PAAM? Young was the first president of the Provincetown Art Association, as it was known, and held the top post until 1936. King Hiram’s Lodge? He was the master from 1897 to 1898. Provincetown Chamber of Commerce? Young was the president and a director of the Board of Trade, its predecessor. The Provincetown Tercentenary Committee? President. Benson Young & Downs Insurance Agency? He founded it in 1901, as the William H. Young Insurance Company. The Provincetown Public Library? Trustee. Unitarian Universalist Meeting House? Trustee of what was then the Church of the Redeemer. Pilgrim Memorial? Vice president. Cape Cod Cold Storage? Treasurer. Well, you begin to get the idea of why he was called a leading citizen. He and his wife, Anna M. (Hughes) Young (1872-1939), are buried with their sons, Lewis Armstrong Young (1895-1918), who died in France during World War I, Arthur Johnson Young (1897-1919), who died a year later of tuberculosis. William Young was the son of Paron Cook Young (1838-1912) and the great-grandson of Capt. Elisha Young (1776-1848).

¶ Last updated on 24 November 2017.


Provincetown’s Historic Cemeteries and Memorials, Key N-16, Page 5.


Find a Grave Memorials Nos. 137735332 (William) and 137735450 (Anna).

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