Home
Atwood 10 BOOK 034-01

(October 2010)

Clustered around Atwood Avenue and Point Street are many of the Long Point floaters whose historical provenance seems most solid. At the heart of the property at No. 10 is a house that was believed to have belonged to Joseph Butler when it stood out at the point, somewhat in the center of the settlement. By the 1860s, it had been moved across the harbor. In 1862, it became the home of the newly wedded Adelia (Morgan) Atwood and Stephen Atwood. Her great love was the Centenary Methodist Church, where she sang in the choir. Joseph Collins and Harry Clark of San Francisco bought the house in 1999 and undertook a renovation that preserved a lot of the distinctive architectural features that had grown by accretion over the decades. — From Building Provincetown (2015).


Clustered around Atwood Avenue and Point Street are many of the Long Point floaters whose historical claim to fame seems most credible. At the heart of the property at No. 10 is a house that was believed to have belonged to Joseph Butler when it stood out at the point, somewhat in the center of the settlement. By the 1860s, it had been moved across the harbor and stood on what was once known as Atwood’s Avenue. In 1862, it became the home of the newly wedded Adelia C. (Morgan) Atwood (1844-1936) and Stephen F. Atwood (d ±1921). Mrs. Atwood’s great love was the Centenary Methodist Church, in which she was active. “Gifted with a sweet soprano voice, she was in the choir for many years,” The Advocate reported at her death.

A few months after Mrs. Atwood’s death in 1936, title to the property was transferred from her daughter, Fannie H. Chipman (±1865-1954), to Eva H. Bidwell (d 1959). Under Mrs. Bidwell’s ownership, this “quaint old Cape Cod cottage ‘down the lane’” was included in a 1941 open house tour, as The Advocate reported. The house was also used as a summer home by Mrs. Bidwell’s daughter, Vivian M. Brower, and her husband Garret D. Brower (d 1949). Mrs. Brower took title to the property in 1952. She sold it in turn to Donald C. Procter in 1963, who owned the house for 23 years before selling it to Dr. Bruce P. and Julia K. Abbott. They sold the house in 1999 to Joseph F. Collins and Harry Clark of San Francisco, who undertook a renovation that preserved many of the lovely architectural and distinctive architectural features that had grown by accretion over the decades.

¶ Last updated on 28 October 2013.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.