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(April 2010)

This stout, angular box of a studio was built in the 1950s for Boris Margo, a Ukrainian native who emigrated to the United States in 1930 and married the artist Jan Gelb. They spent summers in a dune shack that still bears their names. “Margo pioneered new materials and techniques to create his biomorphic and lyrically abstract work,” Pamela Mandell wrote in On Equal Ground. In 1971, squatters started a fire that burned the studio down, though firemen did all they could to save the artwork. Margo and his nephew Murray Zimiles rebuilt in 1973. Since Margo’s death in 1995, the studio has been used by Zimiles and his niece, Dawn Zimiles, a painter and mixed-media artist. — From Building Provincetown.


This stout, angular box of a studio was built in 1973 for Boris Margo (1902-1995), a Ukrainian native who emigrated to the United States in 1930 and married the artist Jan Gelb (1906-1979). They spent summers in a dune shack that still bears their names. On Equal Ground said: “Margo pioneered new materials and techniques to create his biomorphic and lyrically abstract work. One of his most notable inventions was the cellocut: made by pouring a viscuous liquid (celluloid dissolved in acetone) onto a surface, it was carved into once the liquid was dry and hard.” The studio is currently used by Margo and Gelb’s grand-niece, Dawn Zimiles, who is herself a painter and mixed-media artist. She received a fine arts degree in sculpture from the Parsons School of Design and is in charge of the Web site designer and graphic design for the Fine Arts Work Center.

¶ Last updated on 27 May 2011.

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