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Bradford 262B.jpg

(2010)

No. 262B is set well beyond the cluster of small homes at No. 262A; so far back on a former “great lot,” in fact, that it’s just about as close to Route 6 as it is to Bradford Street. The 2,016-square-foot house was constructed in 1966, when the property was owned by Mika Marinkovich. The 1.156-acre property was purchased in 2010 by Morris Kafka-Holzschlag, who wrote the following illuminating history in January 2022:

According to Sal DelDeo, neighbor to the west, Mr. Marinkovich was a Chechen who fought the Nazis on horseback in WWII. Marcia Basine (who along with her husband Joe were the second owners) said that Marinkovich was a concentration camp survivor. He was a ‘New York businessman’ and built this house as his getaway.

About 1973 the open area under the cantilevered upper level living room and half of the deck was enclosed to create an apartment for one of the Marinkovich’s parents. At the same time a sunroom was built on the portion of the deck above the addition. These were done in the same simple modernist as the original construction. An oversized detached garage far behind the house was constructed close in time to the house, as was a smaller shed. Dragan Marin (shortening of Marinkovich) was noted as owner in 1970.

By the time the Basine’s purchased the home in 1992 the rear of the lower section had been converted into a third apartment. The house yet retains its original architectural features intact including beamed vaulted ceilings and a prominent wall and large fireplace made of reused brick, said by the Basines to have been salvaged from a nearby ice house. The house sits on well over an acre and is on one of the highest elevations in the neighborhood.

¶ Last updated on 23 January 2022. ¶ Image courtesy of the Town Assessor, Key 3400.

2 thoughts on “262B Bradford Street

  1. According to Sal DelDeo, neighbor to the west, Mr. Marinkovich was a Chechen who fought the Nazis on horseback in WWII. Marcia Basine (who along with her husband Joe were the second owners) said that Marinkovich was a concentration camp survivor. He was a ‘New York businessman’ and built this house as his getaway.

    About 1973 the open area under the cantilevered upper level living room and half of the deck was enclosed to create an apartment for one of the Marinkovich’s parents. At the same time a sunroom was built on the portion of the deck above the addition. These were done in the same simple modernist as the original construction. An oversized detached garage far behind the house was constructed close in time to the house, as was a smaller shed. Dragan Marin (shortening of Marinkovich) was noted as owner in 1970.

    By the time the Basine’s purchased the home in 1992 the rear of the lower section had been converted into a third apartment. The house yet retains its original architectural features intact including beamed vaulted ceilings and a prominent wall and large fireplace made of reused brick, said by the Basines to have been salvaged from a nearby ice house. The house sits on well over an acre and is on one of the highest elevations in the neighborhood.

  2. Thank you for this fascinating back story, which I have also added to the main narrative.

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